Scrabble is a classic game of wits and words where every word counts!  It is a game for 2-4 players.

Meetings are held at 2pm on the 2nd Wednesday each month, and we meet in members homes. 

If you are interested in playing Scrabble in a congenial setting with others please contact Janet Rushby (tel. 285235, e-mail  ).

In 1938, architect Alfred Mosher Butts created the game as a variation on an earlier word game he invented called Lexiko. The two games had the same set of letter tiles, whose distributions and point values Butts worked out meticulously by counting letter usage from various sources including The New York Times. The new game, which he called "Criss-Crosswords," added the 15-by-15 game board and the crossword-style game play. He manufactured a few sets himself, but was not successful in selling the game to any major game manufacturers of the day.

In 1948, the board layout was changed slightly and the game renamed ‘Scrabble’, a real word meaning ‘to scratch frantically’. J. W. Spear & Sons began selling the game in the UK on January 19, 1955. hter sold the game to Coleco, who soon after sold the game to Hasbro.

The game is played by two to four players on a square (or nearly square) board with a 15-by-15 grid of cells (individually known as "squares"), each of which accommodates a single letter tile. In official club and tournament games, play is always between two players (or, occasionally, between two teams each of which collaborates on a single rack).

The game contains 100 tiles: 98 are each marked with a letter and the point value of that letter. Point values range from 1 to 10 depending on the letter's general frequency of use. The game also has two blank tiles that are unmarked and carry no point value. The blank tiles can be used as substitutes for any letter; once laid on the board, however, the choice is fixed. The number of points of each lettered tile depend on the letter's frequency in standard English writing; commonly used letters such as E or O are worth one point, while less common letters score higher, with Q and Z each worth 10 points. The board is marked with "premium" squares, which multiply the number of points awarded: dark red "triple-word" squares, pink "double-word" squares, dark blue "triple-letter" squares, and light blue "double-letter" squares. The centre square (H8) is often marked with a star or logo, and counts as a double-word square